Genre: Non-Fiction

So Sad Today by Melissa Broder

Posted June 24, 2016 in Reviews / 8 Comments
So Sad Today by Melissa Broder

For four years, Melissa Broder has been tweeting funny but achingly sincere tidbits like, “I don’t feel at peace unless I’m torturing myself,” and, “the road to hell is you not texting me enough,” from the @sosadtoday Twitter account. Each tweet is an effort to connect, to entertain, and to score a tiny dopamine hit as the faves and retweets come rolling in — because her tweets are an effect of the very obsessions she is speaking about. In her book […]

Five Inspirational Gems from Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert

Posted September 22, 2015 in Reviews / 19 Comments
Five Inspirational Gems from Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert

Love her or hate her, Elizabeth Gilbert’s writing has made her a household name — and in Big Magic: Creative Living Without Fear, she encourages her readers to embark on a life of curiosity, creativity, and passion. This doesn’t necessarily mean pursuing a life dedicated to the arts, though; “when I refer to “creative living,” I am speaking more broadly. I’m talking about living a life that is driven more strongly by curiosity than by fear,” she writes. Written in […]

Margarita Cupcakes: Recipe & Cookbook Review

Posted July 15, 2015 in Reviews / 11 Comments
Margarita Cupcakes: Recipe & Cookbook Review

I’m not much of a cook, but I LOVE baking tasty treats, and I was beyond excited to receive a copy of Sweet, Savory, and Sometimes Boozy Cupcakes by Alison Riede, winner of Food Network’s Cupcake Wars. This cookbook has recipes to fit any event or craving, running the range of cupcakes that are tart citrusy, and light; fruity and berry; salty and nutty; chocolate; spice, cinnamon, maple, and coffee; and savory. Here’s a peak at some of the surprising recipes that caught my […]

Naked at Lunch by Mark Haskell Smith: An Immersive Look at Social Nudism

Posted June 19, 2015 in Reviews / 23 Comments
Naked at Lunch by Mark Haskell Smith: An Immersive Look at Social Nudism

People have enjoyed taking their clothes off and socializing in the buff for centuries — a predilection that is often frowned upon by society at large. In his latest book, Naked at Lunch: A Reluctant Nudist’s Adventures in the Clothing-Optional World, Mark Haskell Smith takes an immersive approach to exploring naturism and “nonsexual social nudism.” Although not a nudist himself, he gamely drops trou and dives into the naturist community, going on a “nakation” aboard a nude cruise, hiking naked through […]

In Which Spinster By Kate Bolick Comes Along At Just the Right Time

Posted April 30, 2015 in Reviews / 22 Comments
In Which Spinster By Kate Bolick Comes Along At Just the Right Time

In her early twenties, Kate Bolick started writing in her journal about her “spinster wish,” which she describes as “shorthand for the extravagant pleasures of simply being alone.” Despite a string of serious monogamous relationships with wonderful men, she found herself happiest when alone, waking up to stretch across a blissfully empty bed and spending Saturday afternoons reading and napping. Now, two decades later, she remains single by choice, enjoying both the romance of dating and the liberty of having her own space. In Spinster: […]

Three Great Perspectives from Selfish, Shallow, and Self-Absorbed by Meghan Daum

Posted March 27, 2015 in Reviews / 23 Comments
Three Great Perspectives from Selfish, Shallow, and Self-Absorbed by Meghan Daum

In Selfish, Shallow, and Self-Absorbed, Meghan Daum collects essays from sixteen childless (or childfree, depending on how you spin it) writers on the decision not to have kids. The vast array of perspectives represented in this book is wonderful. Some contributors have always known they didn’t want kids, others struggled for years to decide, and some made it through their childbearing years without actively deciding either way. And their reasons for declining parenthood are just as varied: loving children but not wanting to parent […]

Three Britishisms Explained in That’s Not English by Erin Moore

Posted March 24, 2015 in Reviews / 22 Comments
Three Britishisms Explained in That’s Not English by Erin Moore

As a teenager, I was obsessed with all things British. I couldn’t get enough of The Arctic Monkeys, the strap for my guitar (on which I strummed clumsily along to Laura Marling songs) had a Union Jack print, and I infuriated my little sister by pretentiously saying I was skint instead of broke. I finally got to live my dreams my sophomore year of college, when I spent a semester in London. I attended uni (university), got a lot of wear out of […]

Book Review: On Immunity by Eula Biss

Posted March 19, 2015 in Reviews / 13 Comments
Book Review: On Immunity by Eula Biss

If you saw my post recommending the book The Man Who Touched His Own Heart and the Sawbones podcast last month, you know I am have a weakness for medical history. On Immunity: An Inoculation by Eula Biss scratched that itch — and how. But this timely book is more than a history of vaccines. It’s an exploration of the metaphors we use to discuss disease and inoculation, the fear felt by mothers who are trying to do their best to keep their children safe, and […]

Book Review: Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari

Posted February 27, 2015 in Reviews / 21 Comments
Book Review: Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari

For hundreds of thousands of years, humans were just like any other animal. They lived in small groups, foraged for food, hunted, and were prayed upon by larger animals. When homo sapiens was born 200,000 years ago, there was nothing to separate them from other species of humans like neanderthals and homo floresiensis or from our cousins the apes. But 70,000 years ago, things began to change. As sapiens developed language, they underwent a cognitive revolution that set them on the path to […]

A Book and a Podcast About Fascinating Medical History

Posted February 12, 2015 in Reviews / 11 Comments
A Book and a Podcast About Fascinating Medical History

Confession: I have a thing for weird medical history. It started with Mary Roach’s Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex and has deepened over the last year as I have listened to the Sawbones podcast, a marital tour of misguided medicine. It’s so much fun to learn about the bizarre fumblings of people who were SUPER wrong about how our bodies work, and then to see how we gradually began to get things right. When I saw The Man Who Touched His […]